An American Airlines plane lands with a passenger that it did not have when starting its trip. - Alloct.com

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Saturday, November 30, 2019

An American Airlines plane lands with a passenger that it did not have when starting its trip.

American Airlines flight 868 arrived in Charlotte with one more passenger: a little girl born on board the plane. His parents put a name very in tune with his peculiar birth.

An American Airlines plane lands with a passenger that it did not have when starting its trip.
An American Airlines plane lands with a passenger that it did not have when starting its trip.


Nereida Araujo, a young woman of Hispanic origin, was 38 weeks pregnant when she took a plane in Florida on Wednesday to Pennsylvania, to spend Thanksgiving with her family and her grandmother, who had cancer.

Araujo had taken American Airlines flight 868, which left Tampa and landed in Charlotte, North Carolina, from where he would continue the journey to reach his destination.

She explained to a local Charlotte television station, WSOC, both her doctors and the airline gave her permission to travel.

But towards the end of the flight, which lasts just over an hour and a half. Araujo felt a "burst" in the lower part of his back, which announced what would be the rupture of the amniotic sac, without her knowing it at that moment.

"I felt the liquid and woke my husband," said Araujo, who soon after became the mother of a girl who was given a name very in tune with her birth: Lizyana Sky Taylor.

"Baby Sky decided to reach the world in a plane. Mami handled it very well. Thanks to all who helped us with love and care," Araujo wrote on his Facebook account.

Crystal Byrd, a spokesman for American Airlines, told USA Today that upon landing, the airline had requested medical personnel because of "a passenger who needed assistance."

"The paramedics, along with the Charlotte Fire Department, assisted in the delivery of a healthy girl at Charlotte Douglas International Airport, in the middle of the runway, Grace Nelson, a spokesman for the Mecklenburg EMS Agency, told USA Today that Address emergencies.

"We are happy (and grateful, of course!) To be part of the history of this family," Nelson added.

Although the birth of little Sky is undoubtedly an exceptional fact, it is not the first to come into the world on an airplane.

In February of this year, a woman gave birth to a baby in flight, while traveling from San Juan de Puerto Rico to Fort Lauderdale with the JetBlue company, on a plane that was curiously called "Born To Be Blue".

In June 2017, another baby arrived in the world thousands of feet tall, while his mother flew from Fort Lauderdale to Dallas on a Spirit Airlines flight, which presented the newborn with the possibility of flying with a guest for his birthday for life.

More than 50 cases are registered in the world as "skyborns", or "born in heaven" and have generally had a happy ending.

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